Londoners troll New York Times with deluge of petty crimes UK news


Londoners troll New York Times with deluge of petty crimes UK news An appeal for victims of petty crime in the UK’s capital has been met with sarcasm An appeal for victims of petty crime in the UK’s capital has been met with sarcasm “Have you experienced a petty crime in London?” chirped the New York Times enthusiastically on Twitter, which prompted a deluge of sarcastic responses from Brits who were keen to let everyone know just how petty Londoners could be. Though the US newspaper was attempting to report on the rising level of crime in the capital – a problem the Metropolitan police commissioner recently said was being turned around – the New York Times instead learned a lot more about what was getting on Londoners’ nerves. Naturally, public transport etiquette featured heavily: The London obsession with mumbling apologies, or “dealing” with a situation by tutting, while not making eye contact, was mentioned. Queues and apologies are natural bedfellows in London, it seems. The notoriously high prices for alcohol drew criticism: In fact, the costliness of London in general featured in a lot of replies: Our national obsession with the niceties of making tea cropped up … and there was some nostalgia for a time when London seemed a better and more welcoming place. But mostly people focused on Londoners’ refusal to speak to one another unless communication was absolutely unavoidable: Because stressful social interactions brought out pettiness in full force … There were comments about the snobbishness of some of the more fashionable parts of London. And some visitors were disappointed that the city hadn’t lived up to some of its traditions … Then there were surreal comments that were difficult to explain: Dickensian London made more than one appearance … References to Mary Poppins abounded: One of London’s most famous literary immigrants also made an appearance: And while there was a lot of Victorian and Edwardian nostalgia, there were also new levels of pettiness to take into account: It isn’t the first time this year the New York Times has faced the ire of London’s social media users. In August, an article by the food critic Robert Draper was widely mocked after he suggested the capital’s food scene had at last moved “beyond porridge and boiled mutton”. References to the article featured in some of the replies on Thursday: However, this claim may have topped them all:

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